Posts Tagged 'productivity'

Academic Work, Fast and Slow

Should academics strive to be ‘fast’ or ‘slow’? Helen Kara, author of Research and evaluation for busy students and practitioners, argues that there is not one, clear answer. 

Helen Kara

In recent years there has been an increasingly heated debate, in the blogosphere and elsewhere, about whether academia is – or should be – ‘fast’ or ‘slow’.

This is linked to other discourses about speed such as Slow Food and Slow Cities.

Some commentators aver that the pace of life in academia is speeding up because of managerialism, the REF and its equivalents in other countries, and the ensuing pressure to conduct and publish interesting research with significant results. All of this, in addition to the increasing casualisation of employment in academia, and the increasing speed of digital communication, has led to toxic working conditions that cause academics to have breakdowns and burn out.

This doesn’t only affect academics, but also non-academics doing academic work such as undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. Also, to some academics’ surprise, this doesn’t only apply in academia, but also in the public sector more widely, and parts of the private sector too. Perhaps this is because, as the saying goes, the speed of change is faster than it’s ever been before, yet it will never be this slow again.

Continue reading ‘Academic Work, Fast and Slow’

Coming soon… Creative Destruction: how to start an economic renaissance by Phil Mullan

Phil Mullan discusses his new book, Creative Destruction, out in March.

phil-mullan-2

Phil Mullan


The mature economies have been stuck in a long, contained depression since the 1970s.

The pressing question that arises is not why investment and productivity have been so weak, important though that is. Rather, it is whether we are hitting the limits of effectively muddling through this dismal reality.

The financial crash of 2008 was the first significant indicator that sustaining reasonable living standards could no longer rely on an ever-expanding financialised debt economy. The subsequent recession was one of the sharpest since the 1930s but thankfully the system’s collapse was avoided. Can we expect to be as fortunate when today’s bubbles burst?

This book explores the interaction between the forces of productive decay and the sources of resilience that have characterised Western economic history for almost half a century. In particular, it highlights the consequences of state interventions that have sought economic stabilisation, but have unintentionally entrenched economic stagnation. Governments have brought about a corporate dependency that is as debilitating for the economy as the welfare dependency they have created for individuals.

“A zombie economy: an economy dead in productive dynamism that is being propped up to ensure the semblance of life.”

Continue reading ‘Coming soon… Creative Destruction: how to start an economic renaissance by Phil Mullan’


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