Posts Tagged 'new zealand'

Indigenous peoples and a liberal politics of potential

Following last month’s call for a new formal body to represent Australia’s indigenous peoples in parliament, Dominic O’Sullivan, author of Indigenity: a politics of potential – out today – examines indigeneity and what it can achieve.

Dominic

Dominic O’Sullivan

“Indigeneity is a politics of potential; a theory of human agency that provides an indigenous framework for thinking about how to engage liberal societies in discourses of reconciliation, self-determination and sovereignty. It is both political theory and political strategy. It transcends the limits of indigenous rights as a sub-set of ethnic minority politics. Instead, it claims a distinctive and enduring indigenous share in the sovereign authority of the state.

The claim is grounded in on-going and inalienable rights of prior occupancy; rights to land, language, culture, the maintenance and protection of decision-making processes, and the right to participation in state affairs as genuinely and substantively equal citizens. Unless it recognises prior occupancy, liberal democracy cannot uphold these rights as measures of justice. It cannot think creatively or reasonably about the terms of indigenous belonging to the modern state; the basic questions of citizenship – who belongs and on whose terms?

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