Posts Tagged 'Hilary Clinton'

How Donald trumped the political establishment

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David Fasenfest

Every poll predicted both a Clinton victory and that Democrats would regain control over the Senate. Instead, Donald Trump will be the 45th President of the United States and the Republicans control all branches of government.

David Fasenfest, editor of Critical Sociology and author of the forthcoming Detroit and new urban repertoires, explains why this came to be.

Exit interviews reveal some patterns that are instructive. Millennials, of which 55% voted for Clinton, did not turn out to vote in large numbers. 58% of whites, and surprisingly 30% of Latino and Asian voted for Trump. And while Clinton was the ‘break the glass ceiling’ candidate, over 40% of women voted for Trump. Whites without a college degree strongly supported Trump (67%), but so did Whites with a degree (49%), and so did about half of all those earning $50K a year or more. Trump collected about as many votes nationally as did Mitt Romney 4 years earlier. By contrast, Clinton received around 6 million fewer votes than Barack Obama received in 2012.

In the end, this was not an election about who could govern better, so what was this election really about?

The anti-establishment candidate

The answer lies in the primaries, and who garnered what sort of support. Throughout the Republican primaries pundits expected Trump to falter at each stage, and yet he soundly defeated all the logical establishment candidates. Trump was the anti-establishment candidate at a time when the Republican electorate were fed up with their establishment.

“Trump was the anti-establishment candidate at a time when the Republican electorate were fed up with their establishment.”

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Trump, Brexit and the EDL: the left’s failure to capture the electorate’s trust

The US election results have brought out aggression and hostility from supporters of both the right and the left. In particular, the left seems to be contentiously repeating one question: 

“Why did so many people feel safer putting their trust in Trump rather than in Clinton? “

Many people are quick to blame racism and bigotry, but there are deeper reasons. Simon Winlow, Steve Hall and James Treadwell, authors of The rise of the right, discuss the ways in which the left has failed to capture the trust of much of the electorate. 

 

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Simon Winlow

The mainstream liberal media outlets are outraged. For the liberal commentariat, Trump is the embodiment of all that ails the world. A racist, homophobic and misogynistic billionaire, a climate change denier, a man who apparently inspires loathing throughout the free world, a cocky and self-confident, tax-avoiding bigot whose election suggests the end of progressive liberal multiculturalism and dawning of a new Dark Age.

How could a man such as this win a clear mandate to govern the world’s most powerful nation?

Already our mainstream liberal media elites are asking what it all means. Political activists on the left look crestfallen as they call for a new solidarity in the face of adversity.

Now we need to ask why

Initial analyses tend to suggest that Trump has been voted into office by tens of millions of racist, homophobic and misogynistic white men who are angry about the erasure of their traditional power. Such analyses, fuelled by justifiable ire and shock, offer us only simplistic and predictable cultural reductionism.

What we need are careful empirical and theoretical analyses of the forces that appear set to carry us all into a new era of right-wing nationalism. Why are so many people angry at our established political elites? Why has fear come to play such an important role in the new politics? Why is there such a popular desire to move beyond the established parameters of marketised liberal democracy? What is it that inspires such open hostility towards minorities? These are important questions that demand a clear and objective response shorn of sentimentality and free from the usual academic constraints and injunctions.

 

“What we see at EDL protests, and what we see with Brexit and the election of Trump, is an inverted and distorted mirror-image of our own ideological failure.”

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Age: the topic that neither Clinton nor Trump dare address

 

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Kate de Medeiros

There is one major topic in the American presidential election that neither candidate – nor the media for that matter – have dared to touch upon: age.

Kate de Medeiros, author of The short guide to aging and gerontology, asks ‘why?’

Age – specifically older age – has been conspicuously absent as a line of personal attack between the candidates, as a demographic target of would-be voters, and as an articulated position regarding health care and pension policies.

Don’t get me wrong. In some respects, I am glad to see that the ageist rhetoric which has clouded other U.S. elections hasn’t appeared this time, at least not explicitly.

Perhaps because the two candidates are so close in age (Trump is 70 years old; Clinton, 68), or because the oldest people in the American baby boomer cohort (those born between 1946 and 1964) are now 70 themselves, we’re not hearing whispers of dementia like in the 2008 election. Then, the 71-year-old John McCain, running against a 47-year-old Barack Obama, was often referred to by contenders and the media as ‘confused’, ‘out of touch’, and lacking vigor and energy.

Of course, chronological age alone says very little about a person or their functional abilities. Although Trump has repeatedly stated that Hilary Clinton ‘doesn’t have the look’ or the ‘stamina’ to be president, it’s unclear if his remarks were based on her gender and a double standard of ‘beauty’, on her age, or something entirely different.

Continue reading ‘Age: the topic that neither Clinton nor Trump dare address’


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