Posts Tagged 'feminism'

Are the Sister Marches reclaiming feminism? Reflections on International Women’s Day

Miriam E. David, author of Reclaiming feminism, looks at how Donald Trump’s election has contributed to the recent surge of global feminist protest and how International Woman’s Day provides an important focal point for change.  

author-photo-final

Miriam E. David

“New waves of women rising up in protest against misogyny, male violence, abuse and harassment of women and girls, both nationally and internationally, is a particular feature of 2017.

The spark for this spontaneous international movement of feminists was the election of Donald Trump as US President on November 8, 2016.

Not only was it his platform of vulgarity, misogyny and the particular use of the term ‘grabbing women by the pussy’, that provoked women’s outrage but also the fact that his rival, the liberal feminist Hillary Clinton won 3 million more of the popular vote.

Whilst predicted to be a close run competition between the Republican billionaire and his Democrat opponent, most pollsters expected Hillary Clinton to win. Celebrations were in hand for the most powerful political office in the world to be taken by a woman. This was to send an important signal to new generations of women and girls: fourth and fifth wave feminists.

“Everyday misogyny: the casual and flippant comments about women as sexual objects, not worthy of respect.”

Continue reading ‘Are the Sister Marches reclaiming feminism? Reflections on International Women’s Day’

What difference does gender really make in the top political jobs?

Just what does Hillary Clinton’s progress in the US presidential election and Theresa May’s appointment as UK Prime Minister mean for the women’s movement and global gender equality?

Torild Skard, author of Women of Power and pioneer in the women’s movement both nationally and internationally, tells us why she believes there is still much to be done in today’s guest blog….

Torild Skard 2

Gender does make a difference – though how much depends on women’s activism and the political parties

The excitement in the media and the women’s movement is noticeable these days. The UK has got its second woman prime minister, and there are good chances that the US will get its first woman president.

With a woman as chancellor in Germany, women will be leading the three largest economies in the West. Add the two women running the International Monetary Fund, IMF, and the US Federal Reserve Board, and women will be ruling the world – according to some.

There is good reason to celebrate women in top positions – particularly in mighty countries like the UK and the US. A woman president in one of the world’s superpowers will be a real breakthrough.

Dismal

But it is not the whole world. And globally, the situation is rather dismal. Continue reading ‘What difference does gender really make in the top political jobs?’

Ann Oakley: Connecting private lives and public work

Author and academic Ann Oakley discusses gender, patriarchy, methodology, and the politics of memory and identity at the Bristol Festival of ideas event held at Foyles bookshop in November.

Ann talks frankly and openly about the experience of being the daughter of Richard Titmuss, policy analyst and defender of the welfare state, and how growing up in what she refers to as ‘the blue plaque house’ in London shaped her own personal, political and academic development.

In conversation with  Sarah LeFanu, Ann shares stories about discovering and developing her feminism amid the act of dusting her father’s bookshelves as well as her delight in burrowing into deep and darksome archives where she uncovered papers that had not previously been seen to find ‘the shadowy spaces behind and between the official texts.’ Her enthusiasm for the way the private and public interact in the making of people is heartfelt and contagious. Listen to Ann speak below:

Much of the discussion is based around material recently published by Ann in her latest book Father and Daughter, in which she mixes biography, autobiography, intellectual history, archives, and personal interviews to provide a compelling narrative that analysis defies the usual social science publications to offer a truly distinctive account. Copies are available at the Policy Press website at a 20% discount.

Policy & Politics: Why do windows of opportunity close?

Quite apart from its practical importance, policy is an endlessly fascinating subject of study. A core theme in the analysis of policy is stability and change. Why do we witness extended periods of stability followed by episodes of change or periods of rapid change? In his 1984 book Agendas, alternatives and public policies, John Kingdon proposed a model based upon multiple streams. The alignment of the problem, policy and politics streams opens a window of opportunity for change. This model has been widely applied, including recently to US health care reform by Kingdon himself in the 2010 revised edition of his book (Kingdon, J.W. (2010) Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies (Updated Edition, with an Epilogue on Health Care), Longman).

An illuminating application of the model is offered by Annesley, Gains and Rummery in their recent paper analysing New Labour’s legacy on engendering politics and policy. The election of New Labour in 1997 appeared to open a window of opportunity for significant progress in the engendering of both politics and policy – and the authors are careful to maintain the distinction between the two. For reasons of both electoral calculation and values the New Labour government recognised gender as a significant policy issue. Annesley et al argue that New Labour’s attempts to engender politics could claim significant success. However, they examine two specific policy areas – change to leave for new parents and action to close the gender pay gap – and argue that the achievements in engendering policy were considerably more limited. They identify three broad reasons why policy change was modest, particularly in relation to the gender pay gap. All three speak to issues of great interest in the contemporary analysis of policy more generally. The first reason is the way the policy problem was framed: the focus was narrowed to the issue of women’s labour market participation and poverty, rather than the broader gender division of paid and unpaid labour. The second reason was the extent and speed with which the institutions of governance adapted to a new agenda. Effectively they couldn’t keep up. The third reason is the extent to which it is possible to pursue policies that run against the presumptions of broader (neo)liberal and pro-business economic policy. And the move to recession in 2008 dissipated what limited momentum there was behind the push to level upward on pay or introduce more flexible maternity and paternity leave: economic imperatives – and reducing the burden on business – take precedence.

The concept of the window of opportunity has given good service in the analysis of policy change. This case study of New Labour’s attempts to engender politics and policy provides a valuable additional dimension to our understanding of precisely how propitious the circumstances need to be before significant change can occur.

Annesley, C., Gains, F. and Rummery, K. (2010) Engendering politics and policy: the legacy of New Labour, Policy & Politics, vol 38, no 3, 389-406.

Alex Marsh, Management Board, Policy & Politics


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