Archive for the 'Open Access' Category

Open access: A publisher’s perspective

Julia Mortimer, Assistant Director of Policy Press/University of Bristol Press, explores the benefits, opportunities and challenges of open access (OA), one of the most significant publishing developments since the invention of the printing press.  

Julia Mortimer

Julia Mortimer

 

Unleashing potential

There have been extraordinary benefits from OA in furthering scientific endeavour, innovation, business development and public knowledge. Lives have been saved because medical research and datasets have been openly available. Digital access has made this all possible and has enabled research outputs to reach a broader audience beyond a paywall.

For Policy Press, and the newly created University of Bristol Press, as a not-for-profit publisher with a social mission, OA is crucial in helping the work we publish have a greater impact on society and for public good.

Just some of the benefits to authors are:

Visibility & impact: OA makes research more widely and easily visible to researchers, practitioners and policy makers.

Usage: A number of studies and reports have shown that OA journal articles are viewed more often than articles available only to subscribers (See this article in the BMJ for example).

Collaboration: OA publication fosters greater dialogue across disciplinary and geographical boundaries.

Social Justice: OA reduces inequalities in access to knowledge due to lack of institutional funding. Continue reading ‘Open access: A publisher’s perspective’

Open education is not a luxury

polly-thistlethwaite

Polly Thistlethwaite

Polly Thistlethwaite, co-author of Being a scholar in the digital era talks about open education and how higher education’s practices and products must become more democratic to better serve democracy.

Chapter 3 of Being a scholar in the digital era – ‘Opening education and linking it to community’ – is free to download here (pdf), or from the Policy Press website during December. Subsequent chapters will be available over the coming months.

Audre Lorde famously asserted that “for women … poetry is not a luxury.” Artistry and lived experience shared, while valued less than dominant notions of thought and process, is “a vital necessity of our existence,” she wrote (Lorde, Audre. Poetry is Not a Luxury. Chrysalis: A Magazine of Female Culture, 1977, no. 3.).

Open education is no less a luxury. Markets cannot administer equitable access to education or to cultural and scientific information any better than they can fairly manage access to health care. To invoke Lorde’s essay once again, it is vital to share “living as a situation to be experienced and interacted with,” to deepen understanding, to resist oppressions, and to improve lives.

Continue reading ‘Open education is not a luxury’

Open Access FREE content for #openaccess week

oaweeklogo1

Policy Press are proud to offer a range of Open Access options for our authors across books and journals.

In celebration of Open Access Week – 24-30 October – here is a collection of some of our recent open access content for you to enjoy…
From Families, Relationships and Societies:
House, home and transforming energy in a cold climate
Authors: Janette Webb, David Hawkey; David McCrone, Margaret Tingey

 

From Policy & Politics:
Against the tide of depoliticisation: The politics of research governance
Authors: Sarah Hartley, Warren Pearce, Alasdair Taylor

 

From Evidence & Policy:
Concepts and practices for the democratisation of knowledge generation in research partnerships for sustainable development
Authors: Cordula Ott, Boniface Kiteme

 

From the Journal of Poverty and Social Justice:
Gamers or victims of the system? Welfare reform, cynical manipulation and vulnerability
Authors: Del Roy Fletcher, John Flint, Elaine Batty, Jennifer McNeill

 

From Critical and Radical Social Work:
Franco Basaglia and the radical psychiatry movement in Italy, 1961–78
Author: John Foot

 

From Voluntary Sector Review:
Transforming the world and themselves: the learning experiences of volunteers being trained within health and social care charities in England
Author: Sarah Darley

 

Open Access Monograph:
Rethinking sustainable cities: Accessible, green and fair
Author: David Simon

 

Why publish open access?

 

  • Visibility & impact: Open access makes your research more widely and easily visible to researchers, practitioners and policy makers;
  • Usage: A number of studies and reports have shown that open access journal articles are viewed more often than articles available only to subscribers (See for example, Wellcome Trust, Research Information Network);
  • Collaboration: Open access publication fosters greater dialogue across disciplinary and geographical boundaries;
  • Social Justice: Open access reduces inequalities in access to knowledge due to lack of institutional funding.

To find out more about open access publishing at Policy Press, including information about our APC discounts and waivers, please see our website.

 

You may also be interested in this recent blog post: Why do you want to be published? Open Access and making a difference

Why do you want to be published? Open Access and making a difference

In this guest blog post about the publication of her book ‘Being a scholar in the digital era‘ with Jessie Daniels, Polly Thistlethwaite reflects on why she believes information should be able to be widely accessed and shows how publishers can help to make this happen.

Chapter 2 of Being a scholar in the digital era is free to download here (pdf), or from the Policy Press website during October. Subsequent chapters will be available over the coming months.

polly-thistlethwaite

Polly Thistlethwaite

Jessie Daniels’ second book Cyber Racism came out in 2009, published by an academic press that sold books mostly to academic libraries in paper and ebook formats that were entirely closed, locked behind paywalls. Interested readers had to either buy a copy or be affiliated with university libraries to get it.

Then, Jessie discovered the whole world of ‘torrents’. This is the practice that students call ‘ripping’ but what publishers call ‘illegal downloads’. She notified her publisher about the unauthorized downloads, but the publisher, to her surprise, didn’t intervene. She scoured the websites to find contacts herself and emailed site owners to take down unauthorized copies of her book. One person in the UK had posted the book on his blog. Jessie contacted the administrator of the blog network to point to this violation of their terms of service and asked that the copy be taken down. It was. Time passed…
Continue reading ‘Why do you want to be published? Open Access and making a difference’


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