Archive for the 'Children' Category

Telling the truth about Baby P: Ray Jones on the impact of his book

Ray

Ray Jones

As part of our focus on impact for Academic Book Week, author Ray Jones talks about the terrible and tragic death of Peter Connelly, the devastating fallout for the social work profession, and how his book, The Story of Baby P, has made a difference.

The terrible and tragic death of 17 month old Peter Connelly in Haringey, North London, in August 2007 became a major media story in November 2008 when his mother and two men were found guilty of ‘causing or allowing’ Peter’s death.

To avoid prejudicing a further trial, when one of the men was convicted of raping a little girl, the media was not allowed to publish Peter’s real name so he became known as ‘Baby P’. The press, politicians and police worked together on shaping the ‘Baby P story’ so that it targeted social workers and their managers who were described by The Sun newspaper as having ‘blood on their hands’.

The police and health services faded unseen and uncriticised to the margins of the media coverage, although it is now known that there were significant failings and omissions in their contacts with the Connelly family.

‘A campaign for justice’

It was The Sun newspaper and its editor, Rebekah Brooks, who had full page ‘Baby P’ stories day-after-day as she ran ‘a campaign for justice’ demanding the sackings of the social workers, their managers and, in particular, Sharon Shoesmith, Haringey Council’s director of children’s services.

“A shameful and sordid bullying use of Rupert Murdoch’s tabloid power.”

Continue reading ‘Telling the truth about Baby P: Ray Jones on the impact of his book’

Moving into policing – as a leader and a learner

maggie-blyth

Maggie Blyth

Maggie Blyth, author of some of our best-selling texts on children at risk has recently taken her extensive experience working in local and national government to a Direct Entry Superintendent role in the police. In this blog post, originally posted on Maggie’s own blog on 7 January, she talks about the experience so far. 

“A few weeks ago, after a lengthy application process, I became a police officer.

Not just a new job but a sweeping career change following 30 years immersed in another sector – formerly education, then youth justice, most latterly child protection. I feel deeply honoured to be entering a new career at the latter stage of my working life and to be joining a progressive police force, in such an important role, but I don’t underestimate the challenge ahead – for me it’s a two way process.

“I don’t underestimate the challenge ahead – for me it’s a two way process.”

Continue reading ‘Moving into policing – as a leader and a learner’

The crisis in the family courts should mean we re-think and change our approach to child protection

 

hands

Image: Jonathan Cohen

Sir James Munby, President of the Family Court, made a speech earlier this week highlighting the crisis in family courts due to rising numbers of cases and lack of resources.

In an article published in Families, Relationships and Societies, Brid Featherstone, Anna Gupta, Kate Morris and Joanne Warner feed in to current debates by laying out a social model of child protection.

Here, authors Brid Featherstone, Anna Gupta and Kate Morris highlight the relevance of their key points in the article. ‘Let’s stop feeding the risk monster: Towards a social model of ‘child protection’ is currently free to download here.

 

We welcome the speech by Lord Justice Munby expressing concern about the rise in care cases and the opportunity it offers for a debate about what is happening in relation not only to care proceedings but also child protection investigations.

Alongside other researchers in the UK and internationally we have been asking for some time now whether attention is being focused on the right things in the right way if we want to protect children and ensure their welfare and identity needs are protected throughout their lives.

More investigations do not mean more support

A growing body of research across countries with similar systems (e.g. US, UK, Australia and Canada) suggests that there has been a considerable increase in the numbers of families experiencing investigations for suspected abuse in the last decades. However, the vast majority of such investigations do not appear to uncover actual abuse and/or result in help being offered to families. Continue reading ‘The crisis in the family courts should mean we re-think and change our approach to child protection’

School Governing, what’s the story since Trojan horse?

Since the Trojan Horse Affair made headlines in March 2014 the pace of change in education governance has, it would appear, become increasingly frenetic.

In light of recent turbulent times in politics , and post Brexit, Jacqueline Baxter, author of School governance, asks what has changed in terms of the democratic governance of education in England ?

BaxterThe Trojan Horse Affair in 2014 left an indelible mark on the education system in England, with profound implications for leadership, management and governing of education.

The affair which provoked a number of subsequent inquiries into radicalisation in schools, also resulted in a raft of measures introduced by the government in order to counter extremist views in schools and to ensure that British Values are firmly embedded in the system. The affair also left government with some very pressing questions about the state of school governance and accountability in England.

Since then we have had a change of government, a vote to exit the EU and a leadership crisis in both government and opposition parties- one that at the time of writing, is still not fully resolved. Continue reading ‘School Governing, what’s the story since Trojan horse?’

Does child protection need a rethink?

David N Jones and Maggie Blyth are Independent chairs of Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs) and David Jones is also chair of the Association of Independent LSCB Chairs. In today’s post they explain why the review of local safeguarding children boards is an opportunity to improve accountability of schools, health and social care and police.

This was originally posted on the Guardian site Wednesday 13th January. To see the original post click here.

Maggie Blyth

Maggie Blyth

David Jones

David Jones

Buried in the prime minister’s December announcement about improving children’s services was a review of Local Safeguarding Children Boards (LSCBs), which coordinate child protection in England.

This is the first stocktake of these arrangements since the battered baby syndrome guidance was first issued in 1970. This review, undertaken by former director of children’s services, Alan Wood is hugely significant, with enormous implications for the protection of children. Continue reading ‘Does child protection need a rethink?’

JPP Editorial: Why Playwork is about much more than ‘space’

Today’s blog post is an editorial written by Shelly Newstead which featured in the latest issue of Journal of Playwork Practice. If you enjoy this and would like more information about the Journal of Playwork Practice or to take part in a free institutional trial please click here.

ShellyAt the time of this issue going to print, the backbone of the playwork profession in the UK, the National Occupational Standards (NOS) for Playwork, is under review.

Primarily created to qualify the burgeoning out of school childcare workforce the first NOS for Playwork were developed in the early 1990s by a group of playwork experts and the Sector Skills Council for Playwork, now known as SkillsActive (Bonel and Lindon 1996).

NOS for Playwork

The existence of a separate set of NOS for Playwork is crucial to distinguish playwork from other approaches to working with children within what Hughes (2012) called the ‘primeval learning soup‘ of the wider children’s workforce. However the original playwork NOS and subsequent revisions have been criticised by some playwork authors for being too functional and for not describing playwork as a unique profession within its own right (see Davy, 2007; Wilson 2008). The current review has raised some interesting debates, not only about the development of the NOS for Playwork but also about the nature and purpose of playwork itself. Continue reading ‘JPP Editorial: Why Playwork is about much more than ‘space’’

How neuroscience has transformed our understanding of child development

As we celebrate the launch of Abbott and Burkitt’s ground breaking new book Child development and the brain, we asked author Esther Burkitt to tells us more about what inspired her interest in child development…

EstherThe rapid advance of methodologies led me to be interested in how we can better understand children’s development in core aspects of their lives. We used to rely on behavioural methods with observational measures which could tell us how children responded in a wide variety of situations yet which did not necessarily tell us about the mechanisms guiding their behaviour.

My passion for understanding child development stemmed from working as an assistant neuropsychologist in a clinic dedicated to assessing children’s cognitive, emotional and social development for assessment and intervention purposes.

We used a wide variety of measures to build a picture of how the children were feeling and functioning. This work led me to pursue a PhD designed to investigate how we might understand children’s feelings though verbal and nonverbal measures. This also involved a myriad of methods including objective behavioural and self-report measures to reach a fuller understanding of what children were feeling and what they were trying to communicate.

Mixed methods

Some researchers adopt a single specific approach to research and some adopt a mixed methods approach. I am in the latter camp as I believe that different kinds of information arise from different ways of examining an issue and when working with children we need to be creative in the methods we adopt to understand development from an adult and from their perspective.

Happy house by a six year old

‘Happy house’ by a six year old

A keen interest of mine involves trying to find ways that children express and communicate emotion in their drawings and to find ways audiences may better understand what emotions they are expressing and conveying. For example, we might think that a child feels positively about a person drawn in yellow until we realise that they dislike the colour intensely and use it to show negativity.

This has led me to adopt mixed methodologies to look at children’s drawn and verbal affective reports, their behaviours during the drawing process and how these measures fit, or often do not, with a range of adult audiences’ understanding of the children’s emotional experiences.

“we used to think that infants did not understand that the world existed beyond their touch yet now we know very young infants appreciate this”

This project offered a great opportunity to synthesis some core information about how different approaches to examining children’s development have changed our understanding of key developmental topics. For example we used to think that infants did not understand that the world existed beyond their touch yet now we know very young infants appreciate this.

I’m interested in going on from here and a potential next step in this work would be to measure the neuropsychology influencing drawn and written expression and communication and to assess what emotional pathways are activated during children’s engagement with different communicative channels.

Child development and the brain [FC]Child development and the brain launches today and you can buy your copy from our website here (RRP £19.99). Don’t forget Policy Press newsletter subscribers get a 35% discount when ordering through our website. If you’re not a subscriber yet why not sign up here today and join our Policy Press community.


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